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Author Topic: What book are you reading right now?  (Read 139976 times)
Diana
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« Reply #150 on: October 04, 2011, 11:10:58 am »

I love the movie Der Untergang (about Adolf Hitlers last day in which he is not only portrayed as the mad man he most certainly was, but also as a friendly person who cared for the people around him). I don't think me loving this movie makes me ignorant or insensitive or even a neo nazi. I just think the movie was very beautiful and told the story from a different than usual and most interesting point of view.
Bruno Ganz did a wonderful job portraying Hitler and achieved to invoke some sympathy, which was how the role was written.
Bruno Ganz is wonderful. It is amazing what this actor can do with his screen character. The movie was inspired by the book by Joachim Fest "Der Untergang: Hitler und das Ende des Dritten Reiches" - a historical sketch of Hitler's last days. I am always a bit prejudiced against films which are based on famous books (I always thought it is almost impossible to make a good book into a film), but the movie by Bernd Eichinger is really a masterpiece, despite some weaknesses and gaps. Eichinger invented Hitler a second time. In the film, Hitler seems to be more controllable, somehow steerable ...  "Der Untergang" has received very good reviews, here in Germany  (the literary critic, Marcel Reich-Ranicki also commented positively) ... but, I have ambivalent feelings about this documentation ... hmm .. it is difficult to be totally objective ... millions of people lost their life's during this time ...
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Viola da Voce
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« Reply #151 on: October 04, 2011, 01:40:09 pm »

I'm now reading George RR Martin's "Game of Thrones". I've been taking my time and savoring the 800 page book. I'm also working my way through "What Every Violinist Needs to Know about the Human Body", which talks all about human anatomy and how the muscles and bones work when playing the instrument. It's really valuable info.
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Traveller69
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« Reply #152 on: October 06, 2011, 04:45:40 am »

I love the movie Der Untergang (about Adolf Hitlers last day in which he is not only portrayed as the mad man he most certainly was, but also as a friendly person who cared for the people around him). I don't think me loving this movie makes me ignorant or insensitive or even a neo nazi. I just think the movie was very beautiful and told the story from a different than usual and most interesting point of view.
Bruno Ganz did a wonderful job portraying Hitler and achieved to invoke some sympathy, which was how the role was written.
Bruno Ganz is wonderful. It is amazing what this actor can do with his screen character. The movie was inspired by the book by Joachim Fest "Der Untergang: Hitler und das Ende des Dritten Reiches" - a historical sketch of Hitler's last days. I am always a bit prejudiced against films which are based on famous books (I always thought it is almost impossible to make a good book into a film), but the movie by Bernd Eichinger is really a masterpiece, despite some weaknesses and gaps. Eichinger invented Hitler a second time. In the film, Hitler seems to be more controllable, somehow steerable ...  "Der Untergang" has received very good reviews, here in Germany  (the literary critic, Marcel Reich-Ranicki also commented positively) ... but, I have ambivalent feelings about this documentation ... hmm .. it is difficult to be totally objective ... millions of people lost their life's during this time ...
It sounds like I'm an ignoramus, but I didn't know the movie was based on a book.
Just looked it up and it is availabe in Dutch so I will try to get my hands on it. Although I can understand German and speak it (albeit only in small talk) I prefer to read in my first language.

Thanks for pointing out the book to me.
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Diana
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« Reply #153 on: October 23, 2011, 02:51:53 am »

I am currently reading "Eugénie Grandet" (The Human Comedy) by Honoré de Balzac.
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Diana
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« Reply #154 on: October 29, 2011, 08:56:06 am »

I am currently reading "Steve Jobs" by Walter Isaacson and I can't put this book down. This is definitely one of the best biographies I have ever read. The biography is based on 40 personal interviews with Mr. Jobs and is fascinating like the genius himself.
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Traveller69
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« Reply #155 on: October 31, 2011, 10:30:23 am »

I have put the biography about Steve Jobs on my wishlist for Sinterklaas.
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Diana
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« Reply #156 on: November 01, 2011, 10:32:42 am »

I finished reading the biography of Steve Jobs last night and I am deeply impressed and touched. I've never read a more exciting biography.
--
I especially love the passage where Walter Isaacson writes (at the end of the biography, page 566):
"Was he smart? No, not exceptionally. Instead, he was a genius. His imaginative leaps were instinctive, unexpected, and at times magical. He was, indeed, an example of what the mathematician Mark Kaccalled a magician genius, someone whose insights come out of the blue and require intuition more than mere mental processing power. Like a pathfinder, he could absorb information, sniff the winds, and sense what lay ahead."
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nicoli
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« Reply #157 on: November 01, 2011, 01:38:40 pm »

W.E.B. DuBois - The Souls of Black Folk
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"You can run, you can live like there's no tomorrow
But you know
Your days are numbered
At the end of it all,
What you see is that nothing's forever
'Cause you know
Your days are numbered..."


--HAREM SCAREM/Days Are Numbered

nicoli
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« Reply #158 on: November 01, 2011, 01:44:50 pm »

[RANT]I can't believe white people in this day and age are still ignorant and insensitive enough to love a book/movie like "The Help." I mean, I can believe it, but REALLY? I expect much better of the human race. MUCH better.[/RANT]

I know this is sort of a non-sequiter, and I haven't actually read the full text, but the concept itself is enough to make me seethe and I've been reading a lot of discussions about it lately.

I love the movie Der Untergang (about Adolf Hitlers last day in which he is not only portrayed as the mad man he most certainly was, but also as a friendly person who cared for the people around him). I don't think me loving this movie makes me ignorant or insensitive or even a neo nazi. I just think the movie was very beautiful and told the story from a different than usual and most interesting point of view.
Bruno Ganz did a wonderful job portraying Hitler and achieved to invoke some sympathy, which was how the role was written.

Haven't read The Help myself, but I found a review and read a synopsis. Sounds really interesting.

Before you buy too much into the hype, I would recommend looking for the criticism on the book from actual people of color. After all, if the book is supposed to be about them, and not some white woman's guilt, then it's their perspective that really matters.

No one's going to call you a racist for liking "The Help" or even finding it interesting, but you might want to examine the reasons why you would empathize with a main character who seems to think it is her responsibility to fix the problems of people who, in real life, did far more than she ever would have dared to do to fight for their own civil rights. Or who thinks taking their stories and publishing them under her name is somehow helping them at all.
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"You can run, you can live like there's no tomorrow
But you know
Your days are numbered
At the end of it all,
What you see is that nothing's forever
'Cause you know
Your days are numbered..."


--HAREM SCAREM/Days Are Numbered

Viola da Voce
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« Reply #159 on: November 01, 2011, 02:25:56 pm »

I have just devoured the first three books in the Sookie Stackhouse series by Charlane Harris. They are fun, easy reads. Hearing you all talk about the Steve Jobs bio is making me curious about that, as well.
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nicoli
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« Reply #160 on: November 05, 2011, 04:12:43 pm »

Richard Adams' <The Girl On a Swing. Already halfway through, and I'm not sure when he'll get to the point, or if it will be at all as interesting as he's building it up to be. Technically great writing, though.
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"You can run, you can live like there's no tomorrow
But you know
Your days are numbered
At the end of it all,
What you see is that nothing's forever
'Cause you know
Your days are numbered..."


--HAREM SCAREM/Days Are Numbered

Diana
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« Reply #161 on: November 06, 2011, 02:26:24 am »

I'm currently reading Woody Allen's short masterpiece "Without Feathers".
The stories are a mix of subtle humor, sex, philosophical ponderings and New York's life. This is a very, very funny and intelligent book.
--
And I am absolutely in love with the video "A Year in New York", by Andrew Clancy http://vimeo.com/31159101 It's beautiful.
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Diana
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« Reply #162 on: December 12, 2011, 09:22:34 am »

I finished reading John Steinbeck's "Cannery Row" last night. It is a magnificent novel about a community, and how certain actions reverberate and affect all of the inhabitants. And it is a character study of the people who live in the Cannery Row neighborhood in Monterey during the Depression. I read this book on the recommendation of my husband - he loves John Steinbeck's works - and I enjoyed it immensely. It’s beautiful literature and absolutely fascinating. 
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nicoli
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« Reply #163 on: December 12, 2011, 01:59:36 pm »

Constance Curry's "Silver Rights," a biography of one Mississippi family's journey into the desegregation of schools. (The Carter family, the subject of the book, was the first to send 9 of their 13 children to a previously all-white school in 1965, and for the first year, they were also the only family to do so.)

So far, this book is excellent, but also heart-breaking.
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"You can run, you can live like there's no tomorrow
But you know
Your days are numbered
At the end of it all,
What you see is that nothing's forever
'Cause you know
Your days are numbered..."


--HAREM SCAREM/Days Are Numbered

Diana
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« Reply #164 on: January 03, 2012, 08:49:30 am »

"L'Assommoir" by Emile Zola (on the recommendation of my husband). A truly touching novel about the lives of the working class in the 19th century, the rise and fall of the family Macquart. I enjoyed it immensely.
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