Pages: [1] 2 3
  Print  
Author Topic: Singing lessons and children  (Read 33519 times)
Donna
Global Moderator
Member
*****
Posts: 948


Ship wench


View Profile
« on: March 08, 2010, 12:50:13 pm »

OK.  I have debated posting on this topic, but I am now in my "what the hell" mode of thinking.

My daughter LOOOOOOOOOOVES to sing.  I mean, what kid (or little girl) doesn't?   So, in December, I got a pamphlet for a lunch time program called "Music For Lunch" whereby a qualified singing coach / music teacher comes in and teaches the children the very basics of piano and singing.  My husband actually is teaching our daughter the piano part - he has his Grade 8 Royal Conservatory of Music, and he's also a musician, so he is confident enough to teach her what she needs to know to a point. 

I have heard (and believe) that children can be trained to a point, and that it's not a good idea to start training at such a young age ( she is 6 and  a half), but she REALLY wanted to take these lessons, and believe me...I am ALL for nurturing our daughter's interest in this way.  They are practicing "Tomorrow" from "Annie" and "The Ferryman" which I haven't really heard of....no, not the Chris DeBurgh one either.   Cheesy

Thoughts?  Anyone here have kids that have expressed musical interests?  What age did YOU all get the "bug" for music? 

Thanks for reading............. Cool
Logged

I can't stop the world from turning around
Or the pull of the moon on the tide
But I don't believe that we're in this alone
I believe we're along for the ride

Natt
Member
*****
Posts: 1502


Wicked Natt The Scourge O' The High Seas


View Profile WWW
« Reply #1 on: March 08, 2010, 01:29:44 pm »

I'm too young for having my own kids of such age, but I can share my story. I always loved singing - ever since I remember myself and even before that, or so my mom says  Smiley My grandma (whom I still miss every day) played the violin and mom plays the piano so they taught me music and loads of songs. I didn't take music lessons or anything from outside, but at school we had music theory as a compulsory subject which I hated in every fiber of my being. The fact the we had a very passionless (least to say) teacher didn't help it. I continued singing whenever I could - school ensembles etc, but didn't receive professional vocal training until I was 17 and have been studying vocals ever since.
Logged

"If you did Scenes From a Memory movie, who would play Victoria?" - "John Myung".

"I can hear myself screaming in the background. I have to tell myself to shut up".
- James LaBrie, Used Bin radio

nicoli
Member
*****
Posts: 852


Puttin' On My Ranty-Pants


View Profile WWW
« Reply #2 on: March 08, 2010, 01:43:06 pm »

I actually started singing with the New England Treble Chorus and taking piano lessons privately when I was six, and it did no damage to me. In fact, it was probably the best thing that could have happened to me.

(Although you'll want to watch out for militant chorus masters like Marie Stultz, from the NE Treble Chorus. SCARY LADY. It's good to sort of "audition" your teachers to see who works the best with children, because it's certainly not enough for them to know their stuff and be able to teach.)

If you're looking for a private instructor, make sure they aren't going to jump into music theory from the start. It's something that has to be gradually built up. But as long as they have the capability of teaching music theory, that's what counts.
Logged

"You can run, you can live like there's no tomorrow
But you know
Your days are numbered
At the end of it all,
What you see is that nothing's forever
'Cause you know
Your days are numbered..."


--HAREM SCAREM/Days Are Numbered

w34vi1
Member
*****
Posts: 2441


Ship Tour Date carrier pigeon and artist


View Profile
« Reply #3 on: March 08, 2010, 02:07:44 pm »

it all depends on the child really... if i remember right didn't James start singing at a young age Cheesy

It also bears true for parents who send their girls to ballet school at the age of 5 or sports like little league... it just depends on the parents. A good suggestion is middle school aged students. I was a self taught singer (using the styles of others to mold my own style.) with instruments, the Trombone is the only thing i got lessons. Otherwise, Guitar, Piano, Bass and the Set are all self taught. 

Logged

Natt
Member
*****
Posts: 1502


Wicked Natt The Scourge O' The High Seas


View Profile WWW
« Reply #4 on: March 08, 2010, 02:12:38 pm »

If you're looking for a private instructor, make sure they aren't going to jump into music theory from the start. It's something that has to be gradually built up. But as long as they have the capability of teaching music theory, that's what counts.

absolutely agree on this. Jumping into music theory from the start nearly killed the buzz for me
Logged

"If you did Scenes From a Memory movie, who would play Victoria?" - "John Myung".

"I can hear myself screaming in the background. I have to tell myself to shut up".
- James LaBrie, Used Bin radio

Donna
Global Moderator
Member
*****
Posts: 948


Ship wench


View Profile
« Reply #5 on: March 08, 2010, 02:33:32 pm »

@ All  - thanks for sharing, so far.... Smiley

@ Natt - I agree; Music has to be LOVED.  It has to be a passion that has to be nurtured and nourished in a proper fashion, with a mentor / teacher that shares the passion with you.  My husband is teaching her some theory so that she knows WHERE these notes are coming from; giving names to the notes, the clefs, etc.  I agree with him too...you have to start their understanding of what they are reading somewhere.  Just don't take the "fun" out of the music for them.  That's not a teacher, that's just someone wanting $$$ and not caring for their student.

@ nicoli - I actually called her teacher beginning of January before I enrolled her.  I wanted to talk to her and get a feel for her.  I am totally blessed though.  These kids have a woman who so far, has a passion for singing.  She ensured her own training to me, and I get to see her when I leave Victoria's lunch off at school.  Being a stay at home mom (for now....) has it's advantages.  She only does this once a week for 40 minutes - Wednesdays, and it's until the end of April.  The other "singing" is done on her time.....like the shower!   Cheesy Cheesy Cheesy

@ Ash - (sorry I like using this name for you - it's nicer) - it's GREAT when you are talented enough to teach yourself an instrument.  I WISH I had that kind of capability.  I suppose when Victoria gets older, she may have it as well, but for now, she requires guidance.   I hope she can acquire some kind of self taught talent where she can take an element of music and run with it.  I would be so happy for her!   Grin

Now, I am NOT one of those parents who is like 'GO GO GO!!!  YOU HAVE TO DO THIS!!!"   No way.  Far from it.  BUT....we are teaching her that if she makes the decision to take a lesson, she must follow through with it for the duration....be it 4 weeks, 3 weeks or whatever.  Then after that "term" is over, we let her decide if she wants to continue. 
So she may or may not want to do this again next year in Grade 2.  My guess is she will.

I have also heard it said that you have to be very careful because their little voices are not developed yet.  I think this is totally true. 


Logged

I can't stop the world from turning around
Or the pull of the moon on the tide
But I don't believe that we're in this alone
I believe we're along for the ride

w34vi1
Member
*****
Posts: 2441


Ship Tour Date carrier pigeon and artist


View Profile
« Reply #6 on: March 08, 2010, 02:56:14 pm »

@ All  - thanks for sharing, so far.... Smiley


@ Ash - (sorry I like using this name for you - it's nicer) - it's GREAT when you are talented enough to teach yourself an instrument.  I WISH I had that kind of capability.  I suppose when Victoria gets older, she may have it as well, but for now, she requires guidance.   I hope she can acquire some kind of self taught talent where she can take an element of music and run with it.  I would be so happy for her!   Grin

Now, I am NOT one of those parents who is like 'GO GO GO!!!  YOU HAVE TO DO THIS!!!"   No way.  Far from it.  BUT....we are teaching her that if she makes the decision to take a lesson, she must follow through with it for the duration....be it 4 weeks, 3 weeks or whatever.  Then after that "term" is over, we let her decide if she wants to continue. 
So she may or may not want to do this again next year in Grade 2.  My guess is she will.

I have also heard it said that you have to be very careful because their little voices are not developed yet.  I think this is totally true. 



w34vi1 is hard to pronounce or type if your not used to it Smiley

if there is a passion then there will be forward momentum.. that's the only way i can describe it.
Logged

Donna
Global Moderator
Member
*****
Posts: 948


Ship wench


View Profile
« Reply #7 on: March 08, 2010, 03:11:22 pm »

That goes without saying.  Either you WANT to do something, or you don't.   Wink
Logged

I can't stop the world from turning around
Or the pull of the moon on the tide
But I don't believe that we're in this alone
I believe we're along for the ride

Viola da Voce
Member
*****
Posts: 579



View Profile WWW
« Reply #8 on: March 08, 2010, 05:33:10 pm »

I'm a Suzuki violin teacher, and part of the Suzuki philosophy is that it is best to begin musical education as early as possible. Early childhood music classes (without instruments) which explore singing, dancing, and tapping rhythms, can begin for children as young as six months old. The ideal time for many children to begin learning how to play an instrument can be between the ages of three and five. It totally depends on the child and his or her readiness. I myself have started children as young as four years old. I can't speak for singing, since I'm in instrumentalist, but I would guess that your daughter is a good age to begin voice lessons. It sounds like you have a lot of the essential components for success - a child who wants to learn, a caring parent (you), and a wonderful teacher. As long as you and your daughter are enjoying yourselves, you're doing the right thing!
Logged


Donna
Global Moderator
Member
*****
Posts: 948


Ship wench


View Profile
« Reply #9 on: March 08, 2010, 09:03:42 pm »

That's very kind of you, VdV.  We want more for our daughter to experience.  We want her to realize her love for music; if she does feel this way to begin with in her heart.  And we hope that she uses her God given instrument / talents (be it her voice, or a piano, guitar...etc) her whole life - with a love of making music that moves her and all around her.  With nobody to tell her she can't do it. 

I do realize that you are a WONDERFUL violinist.  I have seen a couple of your vids, and you truly would make me proud if you were my son.   Smiley  I took violin from grade 5-12, and because of my own stupid pride in high school, I didn't carry it forward to what we called OAC level (getting the Ontario Academic Credit level)  I regret it, and not carrying it forward to this day.  My husband (then fiancee) was the only one to really encourage me.  All others thought this was a past time, and it never occurred to them that when I played my songs by ear in front of the stereo (way back when); I would feel so much at peace.   I would LOVE to go back and take my lessons over again.  My husband bought me an acoustic violin when I was in high school, and I fooled around on it, but after we got married, it kind of died off.  Then, Xmas of 2009, he got me an electric violin  Grin Grin Grin.  I sold my acoustic to a lady who was being taught to play in a full orchestra in Mississauga, Ontario.  I was happy to sell it to her, but it was very bittersweet.  I am happy that it went to someone who will be making wonderful sounds with it though.  I just LOVE fooling around on the electric violin though!  My husband and I "mock jam" - he on his guitar and me on the "muted" violin. LOL!!!  It's rare, but it's fun to do!

Logged

I can't stop the world from turning around
Or the pull of the moon on the tide
But I don't believe that we're in this alone
I believe we're along for the ride

Viola da Voce
Member
*****
Posts: 579



View Profile WWW
« Reply #10 on: March 09, 2010, 02:58:23 pm »

Donna,

It's so cool to find out that you also have played the violin! I think you might have me mixed up with somebody else, though... there aren't any videos of me on the web Smiley
Anyway, all the best to you and your daughter and your musical future! And let me know if there are any other questions about music lessons that I can answer.
Logged


Donna
Global Moderator
Member
*****
Posts: 948


Ship wench


View Profile
« Reply #11 on: March 09, 2010, 03:04:45 pm »

Didn't you post some links of yourself playing here?  I thought you did..... Huh
Nonetheless...the fact that you reach Suzuki says enough for me.....thanks for the support.... Grin
* Donna slides you down a platter of loaded nachos
Logged

I can't stop the world from turning around
Or the pull of the moon on the tide
But I don't believe that we're in this alone
I believe we're along for the ride

lutima
Member
****
Posts: 317



View Profile
« Reply #12 on: March 10, 2010, 03:23:04 am »

Ofcourse Victoria loves music, Donna !!! Look at her parents  Wink
I'd say support her in what she really wants....oh wait...that's exactly what you're doing  Grin Wink
Reminds me...a few days back, Max turned up my music and started to sing Wither with a flashlight as a mic  Cheesy it's so awesome to see him enjoy DT's music  Smiley
Logged


Eva
Guest
« Reply #13 on: March 10, 2010, 06:41:56 am »

I started singing, playing flute and guitar with only 4 years, and I'm still practising all the three of them beside piano and saxophone. So in my opinion, it is NOT too early for Victoria! Especially when the teacher is a formed person. If you are worried about your daughter's voice I can just give you the advice to control the lead sheets. Children in that young age should NOT sing deeper than "c", because it would hurt the voice. Just listen to her how she sings. It has to sound light and soft, she may not force. If you ever have the feeling that she kind of "presses" the voice stop her immediately to avoid damages of her vocal chords.
I guess with "The Ferryman" you mean the canon: "Who will take us over the river"? It is a good piece to start, because there are no big intervalls and it's easy to sing. I don't know the other song.

Hope this could help you!
Logged

Subu
Member
***
Posts: 216



View Profile
« Reply #14 on: March 10, 2010, 09:01:14 am »

Hey Donna.....of course you want to be careful that Victoria's voice is not overtaxed, but I think it is really important to learn music early.  The most important thing, imho, is the ear training.....when a child learns to **hear** music, they can learn to sing and play it too.  Children her age are literally sponges when it comes to information.....what they learn at this early age will serve them well all their lives.  I have seen countless kids that grew up without any music in their lives until they were in their teens and they simply cannot hear music the same way kids who were exposed early can.  My hubby was a college music prof for quite a while and also noted that students who had early exposure to music did far better in ear training and subsequent music endeavors than those without.  If she loves it, I think it is really wise to let her pursue it.  I think I disagree about not introducing theory....it can be done incrementally and can be an enjoyable part of any music education.  These days in particular, it seems people just want to learn the "fun" parts of any subject and they miss out by not making the effort to attain the tools that allow a deeper understanding......
Just my $0.02....... Wink
Logged

‎"Accomplishment breeds confidence, insecurity breeds arrogance" - me

Pages: [1] 2 3
  Print  
 
Jump to: