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Author Topic: Singing lessons and children  (Read 26622 times)
nicoli
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« Reply #30 on: April 07, 2010, 08:43:04 pm »

I say 'debatably' because I've met a lot of Suzuki-trained musicians who, while they possess excellent hearing and processing aural information, say they are way behind in terms of understanding and processing notation. If they go on to study theory and composition, it can be a major challenge; I remember one girl from my first music theory course in high school sharing her experience with the class just after a particularly hard test. Now, that's not to say that that makes Suzuki students any less talented. It's just a major obstacle people with above-average musical hearing often face. Many overcome it. I also don't know that children who learn the Suzuki method are more talented than others learning through other methods. Every child has a unique learning style, musical or otherwise, and each child must be able to learn in an environment that nurtures h/her learning style to be able to flourish. A more commonplace example of this issue is the fact that public schools in America are geared towards a system of rote-learning by memorization, towards those who are left-brained and learn in a step-wise manner. Those children who are naturally right-brained will suffer because teachers expect them to learn in a manner that is alien to them and makes very little sense - a right-brained child needs to see the 'big picture,' the concept, because learning each of the smaller components as though they are unrelated to one another is simply confusing and distracting.

But back to music...

While I wasn't trained in the Suzuki method, I know that because I had started teaching myself to play piano by ear from about age three or so, I was already in the habit of relying on my ear by the time I started lessons at age six. It was a source of major frustration for my teacher, because she soon figured out that every time she demonstrated a piece by playing it for me before giving me the sheet music, I was learning to play it based on what I'd remembered of her performance rather than reading the notes and other information from the pages. And because my hearing wasn't perfect (nor was my memory), there were many things I would miss, many mistakes I would learn by not paying attention to the score. I think it can be problematic if one method (playing by ear versus playing by theory/score) is emphasized over another for all learners.
« Last Edit: April 07, 2010, 11:56:33 pm by nicoli » Logged

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Viola da Voce
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« Reply #31 on: April 12, 2010, 05:23:30 pm »

@Nicoli, I absolutely agree. There are a lot of Suzuki trained children out there who did not also receive appropriate instruction in music reading. And it can also be a challenge for people who rely on their sense of learning by ear rather than reading music.
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Donna
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« Reply #32 on: May 11, 2010, 09:24:09 pm »

Well, happy to say that a couple of weeks ago, Victoria did very well in her little "recital".  There are 4 girls in her class, and she is the youngest.  She chose to sing  "Part of Your World" from Little Mermaid as her solo, and she did it!  Her daddy and I had tears streaming down our faces by the end - we are so very proud of her!  She was very nervous about it a couple of weeks before, but she got brave and got up and sang her song in front of about 25-30 people. 

She says she may not want to take this again next year, but hopefully, that's just the "little kid" nerves talking.  i am hoping she'll want to go back in.

And for the Summer?  Hah......soccer, here we come!

Thanks again for all you input here.....you guys give wonderful insight, as always.

 Smiley
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« Reply #33 on: August 03, 2010, 09:46:50 am »

Why, hello there!  Welcome to the Board, first off... Smiley

Yeah, I would say she really liked the learning and practicing of the singing.  It's the performance part she is timid about.  It's funny though.  She did her dance (jazz) recital with her group back in May with no problem.  I mean, i understand that singing on your own in front of people is not like dancing in a group - I understand that she is way more vulnerable. 

Well, I am really hoping that she decides to go back and do this come the Winter.  I think she really liked it. 
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I can't stop the world from turning around
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But I don't believe that we're in this alone
I believe we're along for the ride

Viola da Voce
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« Reply #34 on: August 03, 2010, 03:18:49 pm »

Performing in front of people is a funny thing. I never got nervous when performing in orchestra, but performing in a chamber group or as a soloist always got my nerves jangling. I've always gotten nervous when giving speeches, but I've never gotten nervous speaking in a classroom full of students when I've got my violin in my hand. So if you look at it that way, it makes perfect sense not to get nervous when dancing with a group but to get freaked out when singing on your own.
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Donna
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« Reply #35 on: August 03, 2010, 09:24:18 pm »

Exactly!  I see exactly what you are saying, VdV...
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I can't stop the world from turning around
Or the pull of the moon on the tide
But I don't believe that we're in this alone
I believe we're along for the ride

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